16 November, 2018

#BookBlitz :: When Our Worlds Meet Again by Aniesha Brahma

~ Book Blitz ~
When Our Worlds Meet Again by Aniesha Brahma
16th November 2018


About the Book:





Two years after the events of 'When Our Worlds Collide', Zayn and Akriti are now leading extremely different lives. Akriti has come back from her stint at the business school and running her mother's café. Zayn has run into trouble in his PhD program and has come home for a break. While he thinks that things are just as he’d left them two years ago, that is far from the truth. In a last ditch attempt to make Akriti remember the connection they had once shared, Zayn tries to recreate all their memories. But things are never the same when collided worlds meet again. 







Book Links:

Goodreads * Amazon

Read an Excerpt:



Prologue
2015.
Akriti was sitting at the cash counter of her mother’s little café going over the expenses for the day. Her headphones were plugged into her ears as she listened to songs on her phone. Her laptop was propelled open in front of her as she made notes on what else needed to be done the next day.
In the two years that she had been gone, the café had not changed at all. Her mother had kept all the renovations that Akriti and her colleagues had done two years ago. The only difference was that now there was a bulletin board next to the chalkboard menu that had been installed just a few weeks ago. On the bulletin board hung a poster that announced that next week’s Poetry Slam would start at 6PM sharp, and Suzanna needed to be contacted for early registration.
Akriti finished her work and shut down her laptop. She looked around the café in grim satisfaction and let out a happy little sigh. The music from her phone suddenly stopped playing. Glancing down she saw that her phone had started buzzing, flashing a number she had not seen on her phone in quite a while.
Debating for a minute, she received the call.
“Hi, Zayn.”

Airports have seen more sincere kisses than weddings it is said. As Zayn Banerjee waited to catch his flight back home, he witnessed one too many couples bidding each other teary eyed goodbyes. It was watching these strangers that he remembered how it had felt two years ago when he had left his home behind in pursuit of higher studies. How he had come to this alien land which had eventually led him to a lot of heartache and misery!
But there had been something good about those two years. There had been someone who had seen past all his imperfections and focused only on the good that was in him. Who had been his friend against all odds and yet, they had fallen out of touch with each other over the course of two years. He wondered if she was still using the same number. He wondered if she still had his number saved.
On an impulse, he pulled out his phone and dialed her number. She answered it on the third ring.
“Hi, Zayn.”
“Akriti.”
He was pleased as punch that she remembered him.
“Did you want something?”
“I am just calling to let you know that I’d be home soon.”
“Oh.”
“Oh? Honestly, I was hoping for a reaction better than oh.”
“Zayn, it’s really late here. Let’s talk when you’re in town?”
“I’ll do you one better. I’ll come see you.”
“Great. Safe flight.”
Then the line went dead. Zayn stared at the phone, wondering if their friendship was lost over the course of time. This wasn’t like the Akriti he remembered.
This wasn’t his Akriti at all.

Akriti hung up the phone feeling utterly drained. Once upon a time this was a source of her happiness but tonight he was a cause of her stress. The last thing she needed was for Zayn to come barging into her life once more.
She remembered all the memories that they had made together two years ago. The time when she’d finally felt okay to let her guard down and just be herself. It seemed to her like it was a lifetime ago. But he’d left. Like everyone else in her life and she had found herself consumed by her loneliness. Going off to business school had only made Akriti revert back to her old self.
That’s a lie they tell you, Akriti thought bitterly to herself, as she put her headphones back on and started listening to music again, time doesn’t heal a damn thing. It just burns the memories into your mind.

About the Author:


Aniesha Brahma knew she wanted to be a writer since she was six years old. She was schooled in Dolna Day School and went on to pursue B.A., M.A., and M.Phil in Comparative Literature from Jadavpur Univeristy. She currently lives in Kolkata, with her family and five pet cats. She is the author of All Signs Lead Back to You, When Our Worlds Collide, The Guitar Girl and The Secret Proposal. She compiled and edited the 10 volumes series, 'Children's Classic Stories' with love and great efforts.

Website * Twitter * Instagram * Facebook





13 November, 2018

#ReleaseDayBlitz :: The Hidden Children (The Lost Grimoire #1) by Reshma K.Barshikar

~ Release Day Blitz ~
The Hidden Children (The Lost Grimoire #1)
by Reshma K.Barshikar
13th November 2018


About the Book:
‘What price would you pay to be extraordinary? What would you do to speak to a butterfly? 

Shayamukthy cruises through life: shooting hoops, daydreaming and listening to her favourite books. Even moving from the US to India, to a new school, a new culture, hasn't really rattled her. But something isn't right anymore and it begins when 'New Girl' joins the school.


She pulls Shui into a world of magic and wonderment, a world she has been hidden from all her life. What starts as a quest to look for a lost book, hurtles Shui into a world where people live in trees, talk to the dead and speak to butterflies.


But like all power, magic comes at a steep price, and under all things wondrous lie demons waiting to crawl out. The more Shui learns, the more she doubts everything and everyone around her. 


Will she be able to master her powers, or will they devour her and everyone she loves?




Order Your Copy from AMAZON now!

Read an Excerpt:

ABHA

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I’ll meet you there. – Rumi

 




Calcutta, January 1864

They called it the Ares. It seemed fit she would be running away in a ship named after the Greek god without honour. Standing at the bow, she rested her temple against his wooden shoulder and watched the grey haze wrap its icy fingers around Khidirpur port. When she had left the bungalow, the night sky had been clear, ablaze with a moon that had broken free of her usual coterie of clouds. It had shone like scarred pearl ready to be plucked from a sequinned shawl and her candle had remained unlit as she had run down the Sona Bazaar road, holding her stomach tight with one hand and the book – her only possession – in the other.

Running away had been so easy. To never be spat at again, or hear the jabbing whispers as she kissed the foot of her goddess at Kalighat. This wretched place had taunted her and mocked her. It had suckled on her energy from the moment she had set foot on its filthy roads a hundred moons ago. With every waxing and waning, she had promised to leave, but always there was Suro. But then he came. Kingsley, her white prince. For him, she accepted all the names they threw at her, ‘Patita’, ‘Bhiru’. Words had cut her flesh like blades of rough ghasa. ‘They won’t be able to touch me anymore,’ she muttered to herself, ‘not even their long arms could not reach that far.’ But she ached for Suro.

Every sway of the ship coincided with a kick in her belly. She pressed down on her little one gently with her palm and pulled her book close to her chest; she felt a deep tremble build within her; she had chosen one over the other. May her gods forgive her. It was early still, another month to go at least, but this birth would be easier. With Suro, the wait had felt like an eternity, a fate written on her forehead, but this baby’s arrival would be peaceful; there would be no sickness and no fever. Only a pain of the heart that no time would ever heal because she had cut off her left arm to save her right.
Abha pulled at the long end of her pink pallu and wrapped it around her neck. Even now, Suro’s presence was palpable, like salt on her tongue. She inhaled quietly, drawing what she needed from the thick book, which vibrated like a beating heart against her own. Careful not to draw attention to herself, she shuffled behind Ares. Being discovered now would serve no purpose, and only make things worse for Suro. If anything she was doing her a service by leaving her behind. What could it be if she were to come along? Kingsley had said a mixed child might have some hope, but a truly dark one could not be protected, not even by them, and it was unlikely a four-year-old child would even survive the voyage. Suro would have to be left behind; she would be protected, harboured by her father, safe from any blame. And Suro loved her father.

Abha was tired now. She thought she heard her dead father’s voice in the wind, ‘It doesn’t matter how strong you are, Abha; how stubborn. Even the rock eventually succumbs to the river.’ He had been right. They had won; they had made her leave.

The mist had all but choked the city from the sea, and the ship picked up speed and pulled away from grey flames that lapped towards her, as if to grab her and take her back. ‘Go,’ she said to them, ‘go and protect her, for surely she will recognise you when you do; she is mine, after all. I will come back for her.’ The lie lay heavy on her tongue. She turned her back on her black town and looked eastward, and there, on the furthest point of the horizon, a yellow line began to edge itself against the blue.

‘I will come back for you, Suro,’ she whispered. ‘Just give me some time. I will come back for you.’ 


About the Author:


Travel writer and novelist Reshma K Barshikar is an erstwhile Investment Banker who, as she tells it, ‘fell down a rabbit hole and discovered a world outside a fluorescent cubicle.’ As a travel and features writer, she contributes to National Geographic Traveller, Harper’s Bazaar, Grazia, The Sunday Guardian, SilverKris, The Mint Lounge and The Hindu. Fade Into Red, published by Random House India was her debut novel and featured in Amazon Top 10 Bestsellers. She also holds well renowned workshops for young adults at both BDL Museum and Kala Ghoda and is keen to build a strong Young Adult reading and writing community to fill the desperate lack of young adult fiction in the Indian Market. Her new Young Adult novel, The Hidden Children, will be launching at the Vizag Junior Literary Festival. Reshma is from the ISB Class of 2003. She calls both Mumbai and the Nilgiris home. 




Contact the Author:
Website I Facebook I Twitter I Goodreads




12 November, 2018

#BookReview :: Kingdom of Ash (Throne of Glass #7) by Sarah J. Maas

Years in the making, Sarah J. Maas’s #1 New York Times bestselling Throne of Glass series draws to an epic, unforgettable conclusion. Aelin Galathynius’s journey from slave to king’s assassin to the queen of a once-great kingdom reaches its heart-rending finale as war erupts across her world. . .

Aelin has risked everything to save her people―but at a tremendous cost. Locked within an iron coffin by the Queen of the Fae, Aelin must draw upon her fiery will as she endures months of torture. Aware that yielding to Maeve will doom those she loves keeps her from breaking, though her resolve begins to unravel with each passing day…

With Aelin captured, Aedion and Lysandra remain the last line of defense to protect Terrasen from utter destruction. Yet they soon realize that the many allies they’ve gathered to battle Erawan’s hordes might not be enough to save them. Scattered across the continent and racing against time, Chaol, Manon, and Dorian are forced to forge their own paths to meet their fates. Hanging in the balance is any hope of salvation―and a better world.

And across the sea, his companions unwavering beside him, Rowan hunts to find his captured wife and queen―before she is lost to him forever.

As the threads of fate weave together at last, all must fight, if they are to have a chance at a future. Some bonds will grow even deeper, while others will be severed forever in the explosive final chapter of the Throne of Glass series.


Be warned … This review is full of SPOILERS!

I usually avoid spoiler filled reviews but I am making an exception this time because... well, I just do not have enough words otherwise.

The first thing that you will notice about the book is its size! It is huge. Now, like any other bookworm, I love big books; but only if they are written well. Kingdom of Ash is not. It is slow and a drag. Most incidents were written from multiple POVs – about a dozen. That kind of dragged the reading experience as nothing in the book is ‘deep’ enough to call for multiple POVs. Add a number of scenes in the book that were absolutely unnecessary and the reading the book became more of a chore for the sake of finishing the series.

Then there is the fact that everything was just so convenient. For instance, Gavriel & Rowan goes to a Fae military camp and skins one of Maeve’s general alive. How is it possible? Yes, Rowan and Gavriel are powerful warriors, but two against a whole camp! Then again, all it took was a couple of letters from Aelin for the Fae to revolt against Maeve…! Maeve, the all so powerful one, who changed history time and time again, was done in by a couple of letters. It was so… EASY! Erawan was a disappointment too! An eleven year old hatched the plan that took down Erawan. In the end, Maeve put up a stronger fight than Erawan. Also, can we just talk about how five hundred (or more) years old Fae warriors act like lovesick teenagers? I mean, it’s just something that I have come to expect from this series… But when Lorcan almost dies in the battlefield because he was thinking about Elide, it was too much. I mean… it is Lorcan - the fae warrior blessed by Hellas! And he takes a fatal blow in the battle just because he was lovesick … EH!

Also, why doesn’t anyone important ever die in Sarah J. Maas’s series? She did it in the ACOTAR series and now with this one too. They are supposed to be facing, not one but two major foes with armies and magic. Yet, everyone – who is anyone – survives! Anyone who knows about wars and has atleast read basic history of the world knows that not one family remains untouched by war when it happens. Yet in the world of ToG death seems to touch only the pawns. Who doesn’t like a happy ending? But even in fictional worlds, not everything can be so perfect and aligned.

Okay, I do have to give credit where it is due. There are three scenes/scenarios in the book that absolutely took my breath away. First, when Fenrys breaks his blood oath for Aelin. It was amazing. Then, the build up and the final scene where The Thirteen perform the yielding was just mind-blowing. I was expecting a yielding scene in the book and my bet was on Asterin, since Manon is just too important. But all Thirteen? I did NOT see that coming. And then there’s the game that Dorian plays with Maeve. I was confused when they met and what went on at Morath. Never in a million years did I imagine Dorian playing and winning such a mind game with Maeve.  It was just genius and magnificent.

I think I have been outgrowing the series for a while (I may write a separate post on it). There are lot of things I have been overlooking about the series because Maas did give us a kickass heroine to root for and a plot that really keeps a hold on the readers. But after KoA and ACoFaS, I am just done!






07 November, 2018

#BookBlitz :: Freefall (The Amalie Noether Chronicles #1) by Jana Williams

About the Book:


The deep-space transport ship, the Vera Rubin, is light years from Earth when botanist Elle Silver begins to question the use of their space-travel drug, HCH.  Elle notices a growing number of her friends and  fellow colonists awaken from their 90-day sleep cycles exhibiting a variety of negative side-effects and she begins to believe the drug is the culprit.  Some of the effects are minor, dry eyes and lack of appetite. Other symptoms are a bigger concern on a tiny ship packed with colonists.  With each sleep cycle completed, more and more colonists awaken both confused and barely concealing a simmering rage - rage that could be a catastrophe on a ship as crowded as the Vera Rubin.  Elle needs proof, but she also needs a plan. If the drug that allows them to travel deep-space is at fault, what then?  Elle and her friends Ashok, Achebe and Jin-Hai are pressed to their limits to find a solution to their problem before the ship erupts into chaos... with light years left to travel.



Find FREEFALL on Amazon.Com & Amazon.In


Guest Post:

As a guest writer for a post on books – I thought that rather than talk about my novel, FREEFALL per se…. readers like yourself might be interested in how the book came to be written. I think when we discover a book that really engages us, we begin to believe that writers are some mythical beings with a special ‘secret’ ingredient that allows them to write.

This could not be further from reality in my case and in many other writers’ lives too. The only ‘secret’ ingredient I might possess is a dogged determination to get my story onto the page. I learned determination and persistence from my mother. My mother also seeded in all her daughters an absolute love of reading and storytelling. Although, I continue to be the only writer in our immediate family, my sisters actively read books and even lead book club discussion groups too.

Growing up in a household of females (my father deserted us) was pivotal to my central attitude about life. I believe that there is very little that a determined girl or woman cannot accomplish. As a child, there was no one to tell me ‘girls can’t do that’ OR if my sisters did say it – I immediately set out to prove them wrong. This attitude is woven into the story of FREEFALL throughout the book.

The other tenant of the book is the importance of curiosity. I spent a fair bit of time alone as a child, poking into things, exercising my curiosity about how things worked, why they worked and even sometimes dismantling things to find out if I could make them work again. My single mother had very little extra money to fix toys that were broken or even buy new ones. So all of us girls became adept at putting dolls back together, or gluing tea sets that got broken or putting wheels back on wagons to get them working again.

In the book Elle reminds herself that curiosity is a good thing, it can lead to new ideas and discoveries of importance that might have gone unnoticed by others who never asked the question ‘Why?’ Asking yourself why and then setting out to find the answer can lead to amazing things. As you will see, Freefall reflects core values that I hold that women are smart, capable and caring - and can do almost anything if they try.

My own sense of adventure stems from my curiosity about life here, on this planet – which led to speculation about life – out there in another corner of the universe. Another core belief of mine is that you don’t have to have a degree from a university to write and write well. What you do need is the desire to tell an engaging story. The best place to learn how to do that is from inside a book where you can read, read, and read.

Once you’ve read a fair number of books, start mentally sorting them out into the ones you liked and the ones that were just okay – but not spellbinding. And finally, what about the books you didn’t like? Stack them up, and then start thinking about the ones you liked – What did they have in common? Do the same mental exercise with the books you didn’t like – What did they have in common? You will learn as much about writing from what you didn’t like – as from what you did. Once you know what you like in a book, you’re ready to start writing your own story.

It’s important to write something you would enjoy reading yourself, because if you’re writing a novel you’ll be spending days and weeks and months in the world you’re creating. So it better be a place that you look forward to visiting – you owe it to yourself to make it so. I truly loved every minute of writing Freefall. The editing portion was a challenge for me – because it is a bit like cleaning the house; necessary and important but certainly not thrilling to do.

Freefall came into being because I love good Science Fiction and Fantasy – and I hoped to write a story worthy of some that I have read. Also Freefall came into being because I was persistent enough to sit down every morning before going to work (and sometimes after work too) to continue writing Elle’s adventures with her friends. I would spend hours thinking about what would happen next, so that I would have a focus for the next days writing. And then, when I was done with the first draft, I willingly put in more time to fix the things that needed fixing to make the story more clear and uncluttered.

And of course you must be wondering, ‘Have I started the sequel?” Of course I have! I can’t wait to see what happens next in the Amalie Noether Chronicles. I hope you will join me in reading FREEFALL. Be assured - Elle’s adventures will continue in space in the next volume of the series



About the Author:
Jana Williams is certain that fiction can change people’s lives - especially women and girls.  Her own life is testimony to that fact.  One of five daughters, she was raised by a single-mom who placed a high value on reading and storytelling.

The ability to read, coupled with a child’s innate curiosity about the world, and access to books to satisfy that curiosity can offer significant opportunity to a child. Like most writers Jana has bounced from job to job, absorbing stories, cultures and customs as she worked.  She has been a high-speed motion picture photographer, a VFX coordinator, worked in the film industry, and the publishing trade as a book seller - a publisher’s rep and now an author.

But her first love is reading…. and with each book of the Freefall trilogy sold Jana will donate funds to Literacy agencies around the world whose work is to bring the joy of reading to others.

Enjoy a good adventure story and help others learn to read at the same time !

Find/Like Jana on Facebook  
Find Jana’s Writing advice - Twitter








27 October, 2018

#CoverReveal :: The Hidden Children (The Lost Grimoire #1) by Reshma K.Barshikar

~ Cover Reveal ~
The Hidden Children (The Lost Grimoire #1)
by Reshma K.Barshikar


What price would you pay to be extraordinary? What would you do to speak to a butterfly? 

Shayamukthy cruises through life: shooting hoops, daydreaming and listening to her favourite books. Even moving from the US to India, to a new school, a new culture, hasn't really rattled her. But something isn't right anymore and it begins when 'New Girl' joins the school. 


She pulls Shui into a world of magic and wonderment, a world she has been hidden from all her life. What starts as a quest to look for a lost book, hurtles Shui into a world where people live in trees, talk to the dead and speak to butterflies. 


But like all power, magic comes at a steep price, and under all things wondrous lie demons waiting to crawl out. The more Shui learns, the more she doubts everything and everyone around her.   


Will she be able to master her powers, or will they devour her and everyone she loves? 




Releasing on 10th November

About the Author:
Travel writer and novelist Reshma K Barshikar is an erstwhile Investment Banker who, as she tells it, ‘fell down a rabbit hole and discovered a world outside a fluorescent cubicle.’ As a travel and features writer, she contributes to National Geographic Traveller, Harper’s Bazaar, Grazia, The Sunday Guardian, SilverKris, The Mint Lounge and The Hindu. Fade Into Red, published by Random House India was her debut novel and featured in Amazon Top 10 Bestsellers. She also holds well renowned workshops for young adults at both BDL Museum and Kala Ghoda and is keen to build a strong Young Adult reading and writing community to fill the desperate lack of young adult fiction in the Indian Market. Her new Young Adult novel, The Hidden Children, will be launching at the Vizag Junior Literary Festival. Reshma is from the ISB Class of 2003. She calls both Mumbai and the Nilgiris home. 


Contact the Author:
Website I Facebook I Twitter I Goodreads



18 October, 2018

#BookReview - The Tournament by Matthew Reilly

England 1546.

As young Princess Elizabeth is in a dangerous position as her older siblings jostle for the throne.

Roger Ascham, Elizabeth's teacher and mentor, is determined to keep her safe. So when he receives an unusual invitation from the Sultan in Constantinople, asking him to take part in the greatest chess tournament the world has ever seen, he resolves to take the princess with him.

But death stalks the streets of the glittering Ottoman capital - a cardinal has been found mutilated. Ascham is asked to investigate, but as he and Elizabeth delve deeper, they uncover a secret that marks the young princess for life. And a darkness that defines the queen she will become.


Goodreads * Amazon


When a friend gifted me this book I knew I had to dive into it immediately since his book recommendations are usually on spot.

Set in the sixteenth Century, the book is about a chess tournament to be hosted in Constantinople. The sultan has invited a representative from different countries to participate in the Tournament. This is around the time there was a plague that was affecting the country. Roger Ascham, Elizabeth’s mentor, decides that this would an appropriate opportunity for the young royal to experience the world while staying away from the plague and the politics of the court. As such, with the King’s permission, they join the entourage of Gilbert Giles, the chess player representing England in the Tournament. But once they reach there, they find themselves embroiled in a murder mystery. Having heard of Roger Ascham’s prowess, the Sultan enlists his help in solving the mystery. But with bodies falling right and left, young Elizabeth could be in danger too. Will Roger Ascham be able to protect his ward and solve the murders at the same time?

As expected, I enjoyed this book thoroughly as it was very different from all the books that I have recently read. For instance, the book is set in the 16th century, long before forensic science was even thought of. So, the protagonist had to rely more on his own skills than forensic evidence. Then there's the fact that most of the characters are inspired by real life characters which called for a medley of facts and fiction. I did look up a few characters mentioned in the book, particularly Roger Ascham.

The character of Roger Ascham is probably one of the main reasons I liked the book so much. He is the mentor of young Elizabeth and through the course of the story we learn exactly how their relationship is. While Ascham believed in Elizabeth experiencing things for herself and helped guide her thought process, he was also very protective of her. He allowed Elizabeth to experience things that the people of the time would have thought scandalous for a woman to experience, yet maintained a level of security for her at all times. He encouraged independent thinking... Aside from his relationship with his ward, the way he investigates using common sense and attention to detail was also very admirable. I particularly liked him in a scene where he stands up and confronts a very influential man. It showed his confidence and courage.

Elizabeth herself turned out to be an interesting character. At thirteen, she is very logical and level headed. Encouraged by her mentor, she is also very curious about the world. The one thing that bothered me in the book, was the fact that since this was sort of coming of age novel for Elizabeth; the author brought in the sex element through her friend Elsie rather than through Elizabeth’s personal experience. The narrative got a bit dry and felt forced whether it was Elsie narrating her experience or whether it was Elizabeth witnessing her friend in the act.

The book also handles the topic of Child Sexual Abuse in a very matter of fact way, which I admit was slightly jarring for me. I am not sure if I am comfortable with where the book leaves it off at. 

The plot itself was simple enough for me to figure out the ‘mystery’ ahead of time. But that did not take away from the reading experience at all. There was a little action towards the end to spice things up.



Check out my post with LEO on our Blog BFF Musings

06 September, 2018

#Interview with Ishita Deshmukh, #Author of Heart Quake

About the Book:

Bhuj. Circa, 2001. A city wrecked by a massive earthquake. 

They met after ten long years. Their hearts wrecked by the promise of togetherness that could never be. 

As love tries to bloom again in the unlikeliest of places, intrigue sets in. Fleeting shadows… Hidden eyes… Mysterious deaths. 

What will happen when the tremors of love collide? Will he make it to the epicentre of love? Will her heart quake? 

Only Heart Quake will tell… 






Book Links:
Goodreads * Amazon

Interview with the Author:

When did you first realize that you wanted to be a writer/ a storyteller?
I always loved to tell stories. As a child I would create my own fairytales and insist that my paternal grandfather writes them down in a notebook. In school, I took extra creative writing classes. And then, one day, I simply decided to take it up seriously. I am glad that I had the opportunity and my family and friends have always been very supportive. 

What inspires you to write?
The people around me. I love observing them, guessing their backgrounds, and if I am lucky, eavesdropping too. 

How did you come up with the idea for your current story?
It was a creative writing class assignment in the same year that the earthquake struck Bhuj (2001). A few years later, I found the short story in my cupboard and decided to turn it into a novel. 

Are there some stories tucked away in some drawer that was written before and never saw the light of the day?
Oh, there are many such stories. Some are unfinished, some are complete but haven’t yet found the right medium to reach their audience. 

Did any of your characters inherit some of your own quirks?
Sonal, the heroine, has some similarities, such as being independent, stubborn, yet sometimes over-emotional.

What is the best piece of advice you have received, as a writer, till date?
To let myself free, forget my inhibitions while writing. There is nothing good nor bad in the words itself, it’s in the context and the interpretation of them. I am learning to free my mind and play with my characters and situations. 

What is the best piece of advice you would give to someone that wants to get into writing?
Writing for pleasure or as a hobby is very different from taking it up as a profession. Be ready to struggle. Be ready to fail. And if that does not deter you, then you are ready to write and explore your passion. 

What would be the Dream Cast for you book if it was to be turned into a movie?
To be honest, when I created my characters and fleshed them out, I picked out my favourite actors and placed them next to each person. Unfortunately, that was more than a decade ago. So, the same actors will not work right now. Currently, I would love to have Sushant Singh Rajput and Anushka Sharma play the protagonists. 

If you were to be stranded on the famous deserted island, what three things would you carry?
Firstly, I would not be stranded, because I am a control freak and would not let myself get into a situation where there is no way out. 
But if by some misfortune, I did (my worst nightmare!) and I do not lose my mind, then I would have a bottle of water, a romance novel and my mobile phone.  

How do you spend your free time? Do you have a favorite place to go and unwind?
I read a lot. That’s my favourite hobby. 
I don’t go anywhere to unwind, but I watch Hindi soap operas on television. People complain that it is regressive, some of it is, but what I look for is the human quirks that some script writers add to the protagonists / antagonists of a show. I do not follow any program for more than 3-6 months for they start to stagnate, but I certainly study them. 
I like to paint, play the keyboard / piano, bake. So, I am generally never bored. 😊 

Can you share with us something off your bucket list?
There is a very long bucket list, but here are some things I recall right now:
Seeing a book of mine turn into a movie
Being interviewed on TV
Spending 4 months in Europe, exploring the countries and writing
Spending 3 months in Lake District (UK)
A 5-day holiday in the world’s most expensive resort

Tell us three fun facts about yourself.
I love multi-tasking and doing totally different things in a single day. For example, I might cook, then embroider, then write an article, make a corporate presentation and then practice playing the keyboard, all in the space of a few hours. 
I am a sucker for a good romantic movie, even if it is totally predictable (I love Hallmark Channel movies!)
I love planning. My friends often tease me by saying that I even plan to plan. 

What do you have in store next for your readers?
I am still in the planning stage. But it is going to be something personal and yet fictitious. 

About the Author:
Ishita Deshmukh is, in many ways, a mascot for national integration! Born to Bengali and Gujarati parents, (who have a common Marathi surname) she grew up on a steady diet of Tamil culture and French literature in Puducherry. If that wasn’t enough, she is married to a Telugu bidda. She has this uncanny (and unnerving) ability to switch between six different languages in the course of a conversation.
She is a multi-tasking marketing professional who currently runs a small home business in Singapore and helps with her family business back home at Puducherry. 
She is passionate about the arts, loves painting, playing the piano and embroidery, but has always dreamt of becoming a writer. She is a regular fixture at the neighbourhood library and has a special place in her heart for romantic fiction. 
Although not a foodie, she conjures up scrumptious food for her family and friends. Her desserts have necessitated several layovers at Changi, Singapore (much to the chagrin of Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok). 
So, get ready to devour Heart Quake, the first of many delicious fares from her literary cauldron. 

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22 August, 2018

#SpecialFeature :: #Reviews for Anon. by Bhavani Iyer



*** Special Feature - August 2018 ***


About the Book:
Welcome to Calcutta of the sixties and the seventies.

Meet Debottam, the genius vagabond son of a wealthy zamindar.

Meet Urbish, the ambitious dreamer whose father is a fisherman.
Walk with them through the red earth of Shantiniketan.

Visit the jazz clubs of Park Street.

Experience friendship redefined by two people who have only one thing in common writing.

But one is willing to kill to write and the other is willing to die.

Anon. Short for Anonymous.

After all what’s in a name?


Book Links:
Goodreads * Amazon

Reviews for the Book:

Witty, engaging and engrossing, this book is a wonderful read. The beauty of the book lies in the manner in which the author deals with the complexity of human relationships, displaying their beauty along with their ugliness without any judgement leaving it to the reader's interpretation. ~ Privy Trifles

The book is like a slow moving river with sudden whirlpools that suck you in only to throw you over a cliff and land on wet sands to hear the water gently lapping a little distance away. It is poetry in prose. It is also a movie waiting to be made.  ~ AM on Amazon
The characterization is the top-notch. One can relate at least one situation or character to their life. Bhavani Iyer has sketched both the protagonists with at most care. The emotional bond a reader gets while reading the story is exceptional. The words that capture the emotions stand out.  ~ Prakash Parasuraman


About the Author:
Bhavani Iyer started her career with Advertising as a Trainee Copywriter with a leading ad agency, iB&W Advertising. She then moved to journalism and had worked as the editor for the film magazine Stardust. She made her screenwriting debut with Sanjay Leela Bhansali's Black. She has collaborated on the screenplays for Bhansali's Guzaarish, Vikramaditya Motwane's Lootera and the Indian version of Fox's hit show 24 (Indian TV series). She has also written the critically acclaimed Raazi, a spy drama that has been lauded for its sensitive depiction of cross-border espionage set during the India-Pakistan war of 1971.
She lives in Mumbai with her boyfriend, three dogs, and a cat.
Anon. is her first novel.



Giveaway:
3 Paperback copies of Anon. up for grabs for Indian Residents

a Rafflecopter giveaway