15 December, 2017

#SpecialFeature :: #GuestPost - Highlights of You Came Like Hope by Jyoti Arora



*** Special Feature - December 2017 ***

About the Book:
Peehu:
“I heard them mourn my death. I lay in the next room. Motionless, silent, and staring at the ceiling.”
Adih:
“When it comes to a broken person, some of them are expert at blinding you. Spend an entire evening with such a person, but you may still not know how he is crushing inside.”
Uday:
“Who would say no to him? He is smart, intelligent, super handsome, rich, suave and sophisticated. He’s perfect!”
Pooja:
“Pooja gave no explanation. She asked no forgiveness. She just arrived in his home, resenting him for being her husband.”
Arunav:
“He had smiled as if nothing was wrong.
He had behaved as if he still had his dreams and hopes.
He had pretended as if it didn’t hurt.
But it did.”



Does Destiny hold the key to our happiness?
Is it always the feeble that is the victim?
Love can be the embrace of heaven. But what happens when it unleashes hellfire?

Lose yourself in the intense narrative of You Came Like Hope as it unleashes a rollercoaster of emotions, uncovers some bitter truths, challenges widespread prejudices, and forces you to reconsider your beliefs.

Check out the Free Sample of the novel

Book Links:

Highlights of You Came Like Hope

I have written three novels so far. You Came Like Hope is my latest novel, coming after Dream’s Sake and Lemon Girl. Like my previous two novels, You Came Like Hope is getting excellent reviews too. And just like reviews of Dream’s Sake and Lemon Girl, different people are focusing on different aspects of the book. 

But what do I like best about my latest novel? What do I want people to take notice? Well, here are five things that I consider the highlights of You Came Like Hope. 

1. Unique Themes:
Although a contemporary romance, You Came Like Hope is a theme-based book. There are two main themes in the book. One is the issue of fake cases filed by women against men. The other is good luck / bad luck. I think there aren’t many books out there that have tackled these themes yet. Numerous books have been written showing women being victimized by men. But I don’t know of any that has a man being victimized by a woman in a way that is shown in You Came Like Hope. Even though the issue of fake cases is a rising social problem, nobody seems to bother about it. So, after taking the women’s part in my Lemon Girl, I decided to show the other side of the story in You Came Like Hope.

As for the second theme, we all feel victims of bad luck sometimes or the other, don’t we? My heroine Peehu feels so all the time. She suffered one misfortune when a child and could never recover from it. And numerous succeeding events confirm her belief that she is unlucky.

But as the story of You Came Like Hope moves ahead, we see that if there is anything like good luck, it can change sides any time. And when the book ends, it is the ‘unluckiest’ who find bliss. And those who seemed to have it all, lose it all. So, it is useless to blame bad luck and not try to improve your life. We all have problems. It is up to us to find solutions out of these problems, good luck or bad luck notwithstanding. 

2. Believable characters:
Even though I was writing a romance, I kept the characters of You Came Like Hope very realistic. Of course, they are good-looking. But they are not Greek Gods or Goddesses. They are normal people with normal lifestyle. They don’t have mansions, they don’t drive Audis or fly jets. The hero lives in a rented house. The heroine zips around the Delhi roads on a scooter. They are just normal, good people caught in bad circumstances. This might have made the characters less thrilling, but they are certainly more believable. And more lovable, I hope. 

3. Unique narrative technique:
You Came Like Hope uses a very interesting narrative technique to reveal the past of the hero. Hero’s backstory is not revealed through flashbacks. Instead, the Past moves along with the Present using tiny flash chapters. Both the Past and Present plot move together and converge at the crisis point. From there, the Present takes over and moves the story ahead. I don’t know if this technique of flash chapters has been used in any other book or not. But it is a first for me.

4. Truly a feminist fiction:
The main theme of You Came Like Hope shows that women aren’t always the victim. Sometimes, they can be the aggressors too. This might make it seem as if the novel is anti-feminist. But it isn’t. Feminism is defined as “The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes.” So, I think my book is truly feminist. Besides, it does not turn its back on women’s issue either. When my heroine has to drive through the Delhi roads late in the night, she dresses like a man and still carries a pepper spray in her pocket. This hints at the rising crimes against women. Also, my heroine doesn’t ask the hero to fight her battles for her. She fights her own battles, though the hero stays near, giving her his silent and loving support. 

5. Fast-paced:
I tried my best to make You Came Like Hope as crisp and fast-paced as I could. It is only 53,000 words long. Every scene moves the story ahead or explains the character. I tried my best not to include anything superfluous in it. As a result, the book keeps its pace and has no space to lag in story. One reader recently wrote to me that once he picked up the book, he could not put it down without finishing. You can’t achieve that with a slow-paced book.
These are what I consider the highlights of You Came Like Hope. Of course, my judgement might be coloured with my own fondness for my book. But by the reviews I am getting, I think my views are close enough to readers’ and critics opinions. 



About the Author:
Jyoti Arora is a novelist and blogger from Ghaziabad. You Came Like Hope is her third novel, coming after Dream’s Sake and Lemon Girl. She is Post Graduate in English Literature and Applied Psychology. 

Jyoti has over five years of experience working as a freelance writer. This experience includes abridging over 24 famous English classics like Jane Eyre, Moby Dick etc.

Jyoti Arora is a patient of Thalassemia Major. But she does not let this stop or discourage her. For her determination and achievements, Jyoti has received appreciation from Ms Sheila Dixit, Ms Maneka Gandhi and the Ghaziabad wing of BJP. Her life story has been covered in various local and national TV shows, radio programs, newspapers, magazines and websites like YourStory and Inspire India. She was also one of the ‘100 Women Achievers of India’ that were invited to witness the Republic Day parade of India (2016) as special guests.

Besides reading and writing novels, Jyoti also enjoys blogging and has won several blogging competitions. She loves checking out latest technological innovations, watching movies, and listening to old Bollywood songs. Reach her at jyotiarora.com.



Contact the Author:
Giveaway:
2 Paperback Copies of You Came Like Hope for Indian Residents Only
2 eBooks of You Came Like Hope for International Winners

a Rafflecopter giveaway

08 December, 2017

#SpecialFeature :: #GuestPost - When your own book asks you a question by Jyoti Arora



*** Special Feature - December 2017 ***

About the Book:
Peehu:
“I heard them mourn my death. I lay in the next room. Motionless, silent, and staring at the ceiling.”
Adih:
“When it comes to a broken person, some of them are expert at blinding you. Spend an entire evening with such a person, but you may still not know how he is crushing inside.”
Uday:
“Who would say no to him? He is smart, intelligent, super handsome, rich, suave and sophisticated. He’s perfect!”
Pooja:
“Pooja gave no explanation. She asked no forgiveness. She just arrived in his home, resenting him for being her husband.”
Arunav:
“He had smiled as if nothing was wrong.
He had behaved as if he still had his dreams and hopes.
He had pretended as if it didn’t hurt.
But it did.”



Does Destiny hold the key to our happiness?
Is it always the feeble that is the victim?
Love can be the embrace of heaven. But what happens when it unleashes hellfire?

Lose yourself in the intense narrative of You Came Like Hope as it unleashes a rollercoaster of emotions, uncovers some bitter truths, challenges widespread prejudices, and forces you to reconsider your beliefs.

Check out the Free Sample of the novel

Book Links:

When your own book asks you a question

My second novel Lemon Girl is a feminist fiction about crimes against women and victim blaming. When it was published, some anti-feminist Twitter trolls asked me, ‘What about fake cases? What about the cases where a woman ruins the life and family of an innocent man?’

It was a question I could not put out of my mind. And my third novel You Came Like Hope is the result of that. Although a romance, it raises some very serious issues and challenges wide-spread prejudices. While I was writing You Came Like Hope, this novel itself threw a very baffling question at me. A question that I’m still trying to answer.

In You Came Like Hope, Pooja (the vamp) chooses Adih over her husband and Peehu (the heroine) chooses Adih over her fiancé Uday. So, basically, both do the same thing. Both break the heart of a man who loved them. Adih is enraged at Pooja because the loser is his own dear brother. But when Peehu does the same thing, he is delighted as a winner. When Peehu makes her choice, Uday uses the exact same words of rage that Adih had used when Pooja had made her choice.

Incident 1:
‘So? Are you ready to be mine?’ Pooja asked the younger brother, rubbing her hand on his thigh.
‘Go to hell!’ he let out through his clenched teeth. He said nothing more. But his unsaid words of rage rang in his silence.

Incident 2:
I turned to him. ‘Uday,’ I began, but couldn’t continue.
He must have seen my desires floating in the moisture of my eyes. He must have seen his defeat.
His hands fisted up by his side. His eyes burnt with rage as they looked at me without blinking. ‘Go to hell!’ he let out through his clenched teeth. He said nothing more. But his unsaid words of rage rang in his silence.

In short, the heroine does what the vamp does, and the hero says what his rival says. Yet, we approve of the hero and heroine and shake our head at Pooja and Uday. Why?

If these characters do and say the same things, why do we favour some and reject the others as wrong? Do we care more for the ‘good’ characters because we have glimpsed into their heart and so understand them better? Or is it because the reason of the action matters more than the action? After all, even killing is a murder for one and a patriotic duty for other.

My novel You Came Like Hope is now in market. But I’m still baffled by the way this parallel developed between the good and the bad characters. I’m still trying to figure it out. I know that if I try, I can easily show where the bad characters were right, and the good characters were wrong, without changing their life history. All I need is to tell the story from their perspective.

That brings me to the final question. Is right and wrong or good and bad just a matter of perspective?

What do you think?


About the Author:
Jyoti Arora is a novelist and blogger from Ghaziabad. You Came Like Hope is her third novel, coming after Dream’s Sake and Lemon Girl. She is Post Graduate in English Literature and Applied Psychology. 

Jyoti has over five years of experience working as a freelance writer. This experience includes abridging over 24 famous English classics like Jane Eyre, Moby Dick etc.

Jyoti Arora is a patient of Thalassemia Major. But she does not let this stop or discourage her. For her determination and achievements, Jyoti has received appreciation from Ms Sheila Dixit, Ms Maneka Gandhi and the Ghaziabad wing of BJP. Her life story has been covered in various local and national TV shows, radio programs, newspapers, magazines and websites like YourStory and Inspire India. She was also one of the ‘100 Women Achievers of India’ that were invited to witness the Republic Day parade of India (2016) as special guests.

Besides reading and writing novels, Jyoti also enjoys blogging and has won several blogging competitions. She loves checking out latest technological innovations, watching movies, and listening to old Bollywood songs. Reach her at jyotiarora.com.



Contact the Author:
Giveaway:
2 Paperback Copies of You Came Like Hope for Indian Residents Only
2 eBooks of You Came Like Hope for International Winners

a Rafflecopter giveaway

05 December, 2017

#CoverReveal :: Battered Mind by Sylvia Stein


Hello,

My name is Sylvia Stein and I am an Indie Author. I have exciting news. This week I am doing the cover reveal of my book which I hope will be released in late 2018. I have been working with this book for awhile.  It is a story I have been doing extensive research one and because of the topic I am covering I want to be sure I do it justice.  It is a work of fiction and for today I will be revealing the book cover which was designed by the very talented and amazing Michael Dangremond  and his title of his art work the cost of love.   When I saw this portrait I immediately saw what I was looking for for my main character of Sadie Martin Carlyle. The title of this my first thriller is Battered Mind and I hope you all enjoy the cover reveal. I absolutely was blown away by it.I hope you are too!  Thank you for your help in the cover reveal. I do appreciate it so much.      

Thank you so much,
Sylvia Stein 


Synopsis:  

Sadie Martin Carlyle is on trial for the murder of her husband Dante Caryle. She claims she killed him in self defense and that he was a monster. She was a battered woman and if she had not defended herself he would of killed both their young daughter and her.  In short, She feared for their lives.

 However, there is more to this case than meets the eye. Sadie Martin is not your typical woman. Her family consists of her Criminal lawyer father Jackson Martin from Atlanta and her mother Barbara Reece Martin is one of the main leaders of the Southern Belles of Atlanta.

From the very start, there are secrets that are hidden that no one will see coming. Sadie’s story will take the reader through a very emotional journey throughout. Once the case begins, everything you think you know about what happened between Sadie and Dante Carlyle will have you asking many questions and is everything being said the truth?  



Sylvia Stein is a published author with several anthologies with her Writer’s group 750 on linked in. Stein obtained a Master’s Degree in Creative Writing and English from Southern New Hampshire University this past July 2015. She is a mother of three beautiful children Paul 10, Michael 9 and Consuelo 6. She resides in the city of Fuquay Varina with her amazing husband Jeremy. Stein has also published two solo books one was her first novella Closure which she worked on while attending SNHU and published in July of 2014 and the other her first YA Chasing Clarity was published this past October 2015 and it was created during National Novel Month (Nano) in 2013. Her latest book is entitled, The Diary of a Broken Father which came out in February 2017. Her new thriller which she has been working on since 2014 will be out in late 2018 and is titled, Battered Mind.  


02 December, 2017

Nominations for Crossword Book Awards


Sadhguru, Ambi Parameswaran, Devdutt Pattanaik and Ruchir Sharma raise the bar at the Raymond Crossword Award 2017.

The Raymond Crossword Book Award, India’s first and most prestigious Book Award, recognises and rewards the best of Indian writing & Indian authors. 

Over the years, the awards have been equated to the Pulitzer and Booker, and are a definitive,veritable platform for Indian Authors. Awards are given in the following categories.

Jury Category
Best fiction, non-fiction, children’s books and translations

Popular category
Best fiction, non-fiction, Business & Management, Health & Fiction, children’s Writing

The shortlist for the popular category goes up for voting, and has just been released.

Sadhguru has been nominated in the non-fiction category for Inner Engineering: A Yogi's Guide To Joy. His book will compete with Devlok With Devdutt Pattanaik in the same category.

Nawabs, Nudes, Noodles: India Through 50 Years of Advertising by Ambi Parmeshwaran and The Rise and Fall of Nations: Forces of Change in the Post-Crisis World by Ruchir Sharma will compete in the  Business & Management category.

Indian authors with great following such as Ashwin Sanghi, Ravinder Singh, Durjoy Dutta, Sudha Murthy, Radhakrishnan Pillai, Chetan Bhagat also feature prominently in the shortlist.

This year, Virat Kohli’s  biography, ‘Driven’ written by Vijay Lokapally is among the contenders. In the biography category, it will compete with Khullam Khulla: Rishi Kapoor Uncensored co-authored with Meena Iyer, An Unsuitable Boy by Karan Johar , Challenging Destiny, Chhatrapati Shivaji’s biography by Medha Bhaskaran and Rekha-The Untold Story, Rekha’s biography by Yasser Usman .

In 2016, for the first time, the award also introduced the Lifetime Achievement Award, which was conferred upon Ruskin Bond by the legend Gulzar.

These 10 categories make for a very engaging evening at the Award, which is usually ‘houseful’, considering that it is the only venerated award in the literary space in India.

The awardees, sometimes discovered by the Award itself, have invariably risen to stature in the world of literature; making the Crossword Book Award a definitive barometer for excellence in Indian writing in English.

Maulik Desai, head of Crossword Bookstores says, “When Crossword was founded 25 years ago, the thought was very simple – to cultivate and spread the joy of reading! Back to 2017, it is not just reading but a lot of inspired writing that has us celebrating. The Raymond Crossword Book Award is a dense testament to that. For the 15th year running, we are celebrating Indian literature and its upswing. The way the literary engine is motoring most would agree when I say that it is just the dawn of an era!”

Here's the list of Nominations:

01 December, 2017

#SpecialFeature :: Introducing Jyoti Arora, #Author of You Came Like Hope

Under "Special Feature" every month I feature a Special Author. 
During this month I put up 5 posts about the Author/Book, including Interview / Review / Excerpt / Guest Post / Author Bio / Fun Facts or whatever else we can come up with. Also on the first day of the month we will  launch the Giveaway contest along with the first post and will announce the winner on the last day of the month.
So be sure to check out my blog every 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th of every month for something new :)

*** Special Feature - December 2017 ***

About the Author:
Jyoti Arora is a novelist and blogger from Ghaziabad. You Came Like Hope is her third novel, coming after Dream’s Sake and Lemon Girl. She is Post Graduate in English Literature and Applied Psychology. 

Jyoti has over five years of experience working as a freelance writer. This experience includes abridging over 24 famous English classics like Jane Eyre, Moby Dick etc.

Jyoti Arora is a patient of Thalassemia Major. But she does not let this stop or discourage her. For her determination and achievements, Jyoti has received appreciation from Ms Sheila Dixit, Ms Maneka Gandhi and the Ghaziabad wing of BJP. Her life story has been covered in various local and national TV shows, radio programs, newspapers, magazines and websites like YourStory and Inspire India. She was also one of the ‘100 Women Achievers of India’ that were invited to witness the Republic Day parade of India (2016) as special guests.

Besides reading and writing novels, Jyoti also enjoys blogging and has won several blogging competitions. She loves checking out latest technological innovations, watching movies, and listening to old Bollywood songs. Reach her at jyotiarora.com.



Contact the Author:
Website * Twitter * Facebook * Instagram * Goodreads

Fun Facts:

1. I got the idea of You Came Like Hope from Twitter trolls. My second novel Lemon Girl is a Feminist Fiction protesting against the crimes against women and victim blaming. One of my tweets about it came under attack by some anti-feminist Twitter trolls one day. Although it was a very frustrating day, it did make me realize that there was a different kind of abuse and victim-blaming going on too. That’s when I decided to write a book about the issue of fake-cases filed by women against their boyfriends / husbands. A book on such a theme could have been made very intense and grim with long court hearings etc. But I did not want to write a grim book. So, I decided to weave the theme in a romance. That’s what led to You Came Like Hope.

2. I changed the character of the hero after fifth draft of the book. The new Adih is angry. The old Adih was scared. Due to his past, he was terrified of being wrongly accused and put into prison. But after fifth draft, I felt that even though such a man was real, he was not very good for a book intended to be a romance. So, I turned his fear in to an anger rising from his pain. 

3. The tiny flash chapters that narrate the past of Adih are a later edition too. Originally, I had narrated the past through usual flashback. But Peehu’s past is revealed through a flashback too. I didn’t want there to be too much of flashback in the book. So, I used the flash chapters instead. Each of these special chapters is smaller than 400 words. These are spaced at regular interval through the book till the Past and Present collide. They are the only chapters that bear a title and are not included in the chapter numbering. I felt they would highlight the main theme and will also be the unique element of the book. The last of these flash chapters is titled The Bleak House. This is a reference to ‘Bleak House,’ a novel by Charles Dickens.

4. I consulted online horoscope websites to make sure the date of Uday and Peehu’s wedding was close to the end of the winter wedding season in India. Because of the many alterations that I’ve made in You Came Like Hope from the first draft to the final one, I had to adjust the timeline of the book again and again. I had a lot of trouble calculating days and months as the past versions of the story kept on muddling my head. 


5. Till several drafts, the character of Rajni was that of an aunt. She was supposed to be the elder sister of Pehu and Pakhi’s mother. I later made her the heroine’s cousin because I felt a younger character would work better in a romance.

About the Book:
Peehu:
“I heard them mourn my death. I lay in the next room. Motionless, silent, and staring at the ceiling.”
Adih:
“When it comes to a broken person, some of them are expert at blinding you. Spend an entire evening with such a person, but you may still not know how he is crushing inside.”
Uday:
“Who would say no to him? He is smart, intelligent, super handsome, rich, suave and sophisticated. He’s perfect!”
Pooja:
“Pooja gave no explanation. She asked no forgiveness. She just arrived in his home, resenting him for being her husband.”
Arunav:
“He had smiled as if nothing was wrong.
He had behaved as if he still had his dreams and hopes.
He had pretended as if it didn’t hurt.
But it did.”



Does Destiny hold the key to our happiness?
Is it always the feeble that is the victim?
Love can be the embrace of heaven. But what happens when it unleashes hellfire?

Lose yourself in the intense narrative of You Came Like Hope as it unleashes a rollercoaster of emotions, uncovers some bitter truths, challenges widespread prejudices, and forces you to reconsider your beliefs.

Check out the Free Sample of the novel


Book Links:
Book Trailer:



Giveaway:
2 Paperback Copies of You Came Like Hope for Indian Residents Only
2 eBooks of You Came Like Hope for International Winners

a Rafflecopter giveaway

30 November, 2017

#BookReview :: The Sweetheart Mystery (Brash & Brazen #4) by Cheryl Ann Smith


The Sweetheart Mystery
Brash & Brazen #4
by Cheryl Ann Smith
Genre: Contemporary Romance

Harper Jane Evans is so over pro cheerleading but she’s not quite ready for prison. Good thing she’s got a badass ex-boyfriend ready to go to bat for her . . .
Sure, Harper made a few unsavory threats against her team’s manager—she’d had a few drinks and she despised the skimpy uniform he expected her to wear. That didn’t mean she wanted him dead. But when the sleazy dude is found murdered in his tighty whiteys, Harper is the number one suspect—and former FBI agent Noah Slade is the one man who can help. Too bad she once told Noah she never wanted to see him again . . .
Noah may have done a number on Harper’s heart all those years ago, but he’s determined to do right by her now. Yet the fiery beauty isn’t the only demon from his past, which makes hunting down a murderer by her side . . . complicated—never mind the powerful attraction still pulsing between them. Good thing he’s willing to do just about anything to keep from losing Harper again. And an old love just might bring her a new career—assuming she can stay out of jail . . .



Harper Evans is gutsy and stubborn She doesn’t really know when to let things go and her big mouth has gotten her into plenty of trouble in her lifetime. However, this time her troubles are a bit more serious as she is now the main suspect in the murder of her sleezy boss. Noah Slade has a past with Harper and now the only person who can help her clear her name. The question is whether they can put their past aside long enough to work together? Especially since the chemistry between them is undeniable…

I loved Harper. She is one sassy girl with quite a few admirable qualities that make you like her; that is till she opens her mouth! She has this habit of shooting off her mouth without thinking which has often landed her in awkward and embarrassing situations. I admired her determination. Noah on the other hand took some time to settle in. I liked the fact that he ‘realised’ his mistake with Harper and when he gets a chance to make up for it, he goes out of his way to help her. I wished for more back story on him though. The chemistry between Harper and Noah did not really work for me as even though I was repeatedly ‘told’ about it, I never really felt it. The plot was simple and straight forward. No surprises for me in the book. But I did like the way the author handled the narrative. The language was lucid and the plot had a steady pace. Quite a few chuckles sprinkled through the story. But what is it with the goat though?


I am a bit curious about certain side characters in the book and as such I may pick up the other books in the series.



Harper dug through her closet and pulled out a little red dress that she’d been saving for a special occasion. A charity event with Noah was the perfect place to dust it off. Small crystals edged the hem and bodice, giving the dress sparkle and she needed sparkle. After his comment in the car, she wanted to knock Noah’s feet out from under him.
            Since his confession, she’d been feeling warm and fuzzy. Despite locking down her heart with a chain Noah couldn’t break, she just couldn’t completely shake him off.
            Yes, she agreed to sex, no frills, all fun, sex. But she couldn’t quite fully give him her trust.
            What if they dated, got married, and had kids? Then something crappy happened. Would Noah run for refuge with another woman? He had before. Could she take that risk?
            Equal parts of her were worried, and ready, to take the next step. She so wanted to test his lovemaking skills.
            With the tide turning away from her as his best suspect, Mignon was unlikely to interrupt her and Noah again. By the end of the evening, she hoped to be knee deep in the sheets with a warm and naked Noah.
            After showering and flat ironing her hair for a different look, she put on makeup and a barely-there red bra and matching tiny panties. Next, she slipped into the dress and loved the feel of the satin against her bare skin.
            Shoes with sparkles on the straps completed the picture. She’d just found her dress clutch when Noah arrived. She’d left the door unlocked. “You ready?” he called out.
            Taking a deep breath with her hand on her chest, she walked into the living room on high heels.
Noah went still. “Wow.”
            Dressed in a tux with a white shirt and bowtie, he was heart-stoppingly handsome. Not only had he shaved, but he’d had his hair trimmed. “Yeah, wow back.”
            She joined him. He took her hand and kissed the inside of her wrist, sending tingles up her arm. Up close, he smelled spicy and male. If not for the chance to speak to Betty Anne, and having spent too much time on her hair, she would’ve chucked their plans and taken him right to the bedroom.
            Noah offered her his arm. “Is it appropriate to be very aroused right now?”
            Laughing, she linked her arm through his. “I hear you.” She steered him to the door before she lost her resolve to behave. Going with an attempted baseball analogy, she said, “You’re pitching pheromones that I’m catching.”


National bestselling author Cheryl Ann Smith became hooked on romance at age fourteen when she stayed up all night to read The Flame and The Flower by Kathleen Woodiwiss. Her own writing journey happened much later, when one afternoon she ran out of books and decided to write her own. Previously, she has published five sexy Regency novels and one novella with Berkley in her School for Brides series.



Follow the tour HERE for exclusive excerpts and a giveaway!




29 November, 2017

#SpecialFeature :: An #Interview with Ishan Majumdar, #Author of The Celeritas Files


*** Special Feature - November 2017 ***


Quick Recap:

About the Book
Experience the story of Shaina Desai, who finds herself in the middle of a sinister plot to steal her prized invention, which happens to be the principal subject of valuation for a multi-million dollar cross-border investment in what could be termed as one of the most brutal attempts at intellectual property theft in the history of corporate India.

Will she be forced to give up her dream to save her son’s life? Or will she lose him to the ruthless kidnappers?

A tale of professional pride and the heart-breaking choices forced upon the individual, of love and betrayal, and the dark games ruthlessly played in the corporate world, under the veneer of professional ethics…

Goodreads * Amazon * Flipkart



Book Trailer:



An Interview:

When did you first realize that you wanted to be a writer/ a storyteller?
I have been a closet writer since many years but never really felt inspired enough to come out with my work. I guess when I started living in New Delhi, a city where I hardly have any friends and where I have enough spare time after work, I finally decided to go ahead with this.

What kind of research goes into your book?
For THE CELERITAS FILES, a large part of the research was with respect to the MaxCharge technology and its specifics. Also, I worked on understanding the patenting laws and the red-tape involved in India with respect to intellectual property registrations.

What are you working on at the moment?
I am working on my second novel which is also a crime thriller with a corporate backdrop. My genre will remain more or less consistent as the corporate world is clearly my area of expertise.

How did you come up with the idea for your current story? 
Working in an office cubicle for 10 hours a day and being fond of crime thriller films, novels and TV shows, somehow made my mind mix up the two and come up with a number of crazy plots circling around crime taking place in a corporate environment. It took some effort to actually sit down and make a concrete design of a plot that wasn’t just random ideas. THE CELERITAS FILES was the first plot idea that came to me which I believed, had good potential if it was converted into a proper novel and published.

Please share three interesting facts about the characters in your book.
Okay, here we go:
Fact 1: Amaan and his deceased wife Rehana are my two favorite characters who might continue in future books.
Fact 2: One of the Inspectors, Ajit Tyagi is given the surname “Tyagi” because one of my very good friends, Priyanka, also from the Tyagi community, often told me stories about a large percentage of people from her community becoming brave army officers and policemen.
Fact 3: The blurb of THE CELERITAS FILES comes across as that of a novel with a central character that is female (Shaina). However, when the plot was designed, it was supposed to be Amaan’s story. As the writer, the reason Shaina was eventually made the main character was purely for the impact of the climax.

If you could pick any famous author to review your book who would you pick and why?
I would pick Joseph Finder. He is easily the closest peer in terms of genre (i.e. crime fiction with a corporate backdrop). 

Have you read any books that have inspired you to improve or change yourself in any way?  
I read for benchmarking not for pleasure. The works of Lee Child and Michael Connelly really help me improve in all aspects of crime fiction writing.

Name three things that you believe are important to character development?
Clear description of the physical appearance, a good backstory (assuming the character is relevant enough) and some prominent characteristic traits which clearly distinguish the character from others.

Do you ever experience writer’s block? If so what helps you to get over it?
Luckily I haven’t experienced it as yet. Obviously there are times when I feel my pace slacken. Pushing myself really hard to get up and reach the coffee shop where I sit and write is the critical part there. Once I reach, I know I will be able to write.

What part of the writing process do you enjoy the most?
I guess it would be writing the chapters which involve confrontational scenes/ scenes with revelations which are the most fun part. The scene plays like a movie inside my head and I can’t get up until I have finished writing it.

Do you know the ending of your books before you finish writing them?
Yes, I do. I think it is the most common practice among crime thriller writers to write the end first and then build the plot backwards.

What is the best piece of advice you have received, as a writer, till date?
Focus on your creativity and your writing more than anything else. The reviews and the social media stuff will flow.

What is the best piece of advice you would give to someone that wants to get into writing?
Write for the love of it, not for fame or money. Write to influence the world with your words and your stories. Nothing else matters.

Anything else that you would like to share with your readers?
I plan to come out with a new release of the same genre i.e. crime fiction with a corporate backdrop/ corporate espionage etc. every year. Hopefully, I might even increase my publishing speed and churn out a new release every 9-10 months. Please follow me on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/theceleritasfiles/ and twitter - @ishanmajumdar1 for updates.

About the Author
Ishan is a qualified Chartered Accountant and holds a Master’s degree in Management from HEC Paris (Grande Ecole). Born and brought up in the suburbs of Mumbai, Ishan went on to complete his graduation from Narsee Monjee College of Commerce and Economics and moved to Europe for further studies. He has a rich corporate exposure, having worked in investment banking and strategy roles in multinational companies such as BNP Paribas, Credit Agricole and Danone.
Ishan is fluent in six languages including French and Spanish, as a large part of his working life was spent in France and Spain. He currently works with a venture capital fund based in New Delhi, India.







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