Follow Us @soratemplates

13 April, 2019

#BookReview :: The Lies of Locke Lamora (Gentleman Bastard #1) by Scott Lynch

They say that the Thorn of Camorr can beat anyone in a fight. They say he steals from the rich and gives to the poor. They say he's part man, part myth, and mostly street-corner rumor. And they are wrong on every count.

Only averagely tall, slender, and god-awful with a sword, Locke Lamora is the fabled Thorn, and the greatest weapons at his disposal are his wit and cunning. He steals from the rich - they're the only ones worth stealing from - but the poor can go steal for themselves. What Locke cons, wheedles and tricks into his possession is strictly for him and his band of fellow con-artists and thieves: the Gentleman Bastards.

Together their domain is the city of Camorr. Built of Elderglass by a race no-one remembers, it's a city of shifting revels, filthy canals, baroque palaces and crowded cemeteries. Home to Dons, merchants, soldiers, beggars, cripples, and feral children. And to Capa Barsavi, the criminal mastermind who runs the city.

But there are whispers of a challenge to the Capa's power. A challenge from a man no one has ever seen, a man no blade can touch. The Grey King is coming.

A man would be well advised not to be caught between Capa Barsavi and The Grey King. Even such a master of the sword as the Thorn of Camorr. As for Locke Lamora ...


“There's no freedom quite like the freedom of being constantly underestimated.” 

I picked up this book on recommendation from a very trusted source. Though it was a recommendation, all I was told about the book was that it was something that I may like. So, when I picked it up, I wasn’t completely sure what to expect from it.

Locke was mentored by ‘Thiefmaker’ very early in his life. But soon the pupil became more than what the mentor could handle and was passed onto ‘Father Chains’, a blind priest. Needless to say, Father Chains is not a mere priest but is the leader of ‘Gentleman Bastards’ group. This group operates in the underground as a group of menial thieves who earn their living mainly by pick pocketing. Capa Barsavi is the equivalent of a don in the criminal underworld of Camorr and the ‘Gentleman Bastards’ pay their tribute as the minor players that they are known to be. The thing is, they are not what they seem to be… especially under Locke’s leadership, they plan and execute intricate con jobs that are usually attributed to the ‘Thorn of Camorr’. But things are about to change as Capa Barsavi has a challenger in The Grey King, a man no one has seen and lived to tell the tale. With the underworld and the Secret Peace threatened, The Grey King threatens everything including the way of life in Camorr. Will the Thorn of Camorr be enough to stop The Grey King? 

The world setting is the most fantastical thing about this book. The author has woven in fantasy into the setting with a number of threads. A lot of things are shown and some are only hinted at. I did wish that a little more of the fantasy elements were utilized in the plot and that probably is the only point I can nit-pick about in this book. Those elements that were introduced in the world setting were barely used leaving me to believe that maybe they have been set up for the rest of the series. 

The characterizations were absolutely perfect. The main characters in the book are that of the group of Gentleman Bastards, Capa Barsavi and The Grey King. The author has developed these characters in a way to optimize their personalities and their roles in the story. I loved the characters of Locke and Jean the most, followed by Bug and The Grey King. The author has also put in some kick ass secondary characters whose part in the story line is undeniable.  I would also like to take a moment to mention the representation of women in the book that’s the first in a series titled ‘Gentleman’ Bastards. Granted that they are not very well represented in the primary set of characters, but there are some secondary characters that are amazing and it is made clear that the city of Camorr is basically run by some very powerful and influential women. 

The author language and narrative style is just perfect. Having finished the book, I cannot imagine it being told any other way. The narrative jumps timelines – one in the present, and another to give us the back stories of the important characters. The best part of the book is that Scott Lynch has managed to pack in some twists that even I could not predict! It is a complete roller-coaster with shifting allegiances and ever adjusting course of action.

I am looking forward to picking up the second in the series and in the meantime I would recommend this book to anyone who likes fantasy, thrillers and are fans of a good story telling style.



This post is a part of A to Z Challenge and BlogchatterA2Z


2 comments:

  1. Sounds interesting. I'll definitely check it out!
    www.nooranandchawla.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Five star from you means the book is worth reading. I loved your review, and will give it a try. :) Quite a nice cover too.

    ReplyDelete